May 9, 2021
Lenovo Legion 7i Full Review

Lenovo Legion 7i Full Review

Short Review

The Lenovo Legion 7i is a fantastic gaming laptop that incorporates aluminum craftsmanship design and impressive sports performance. The machine would not seem unsuitable among business-oriented devices such as the HP Elite Dragonfly or MacBook Air.

This can be a problem for anyone looking for something in the classic ‘gamer’ beauty, and of course, there are quirkier-looking machines available at the same price – though we can’t offer the Legion 7i for its looks.

It is also worth mentioning that it shakes the bright RGB light that we have seen on the laptop for a while. Closing this will keep you looking like a business if you need it.

While Lenovo is not as related to gaming hardware as Alienware is, the Legion range of laptops, desktop computers, and franchises has actually done very well against important rivals like the Razer Blade 15 and the Asus ROG Zephyrus M15.

There have been a lot of laptops released with the latest GPU mobiles on the Nvidia GeForce RTX 3000 in recent months, but that doesn’t mean the 2080 Super doesn’t have the ability to do the knocking job.

Combined with the 10th gen Intel i7-10875H, our review model handles almost all the work we have forced, from many chrome tabs and many applications to playing AAA-looking titles and first-person shooters with smooth silky framerate.

The setup we have tested will cost about $ 2,450 / £ 1,780 (approximately AU $ 3,200), but there are a variety of different options to choose from if you go against the good feeling of playing.

It was quite quiet and cool when playing the wanted themes again, so if the sound is a concern this is more appropriate than most other laptops we have tested.

All in all, don’t ignore this because new RTX 3000 series GPUs are available – the Lenovo Legion 7i can still inspire us still the old hardware and can be a great way for anyone looking to buy a new gaming laptop.

Lenovo Legion 7i Gaming Laptop

Here continues the Lenovo Legion 7i configuration sent to GAT for review:

CPU – 2.31 GHz Intel Core i7-10875H (8-core, 16MB cache, up to 5.1GHz)
Graphics – GeForce RTX 2080 Super Max Q
RAM – 16GB DDR4 (3200MHz)
Screen – 15.6-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080) 144hz
Storage – 1TB M.2 NVMe SSD
Ports – 1x USB-A 3.2 (gen 1), 2x Two USB-A 3.2 (Gen 2), USB-C 3.2, HDMI 2.0, RJ45 Ethernet, Thunderbolt 3, 3.5mm audio
Connectivity – Intel Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax (2×2), Bluetooth 5.0
Camera – 720p front facing, built in privacy cover
Weight – 4.8lbs (2.2kg)
Size – 14.1 x 10.2 x 0.78 inches (358 x 259 x 19 millimeter); W x D x H

Price and Availability

The reviews we reviewed sell for about $ 2,450 / £ 1,780 (about AU $ 3,200), which puts it firmly in the ‘expensive’ category of free-to-play gaming laptops, even though we’ve seen major pricetags. Without the cost, we don’t think Legion 7i is too expensive for what you get, so if you want to buy it it will be well-spent money.

With that, you get graphics for the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Super MaxQ and Intel Core processor i7-10875H, a combination of more than the ability to manage the games and programs you want without any conflict. This adjustment had 16GB of RAM, 1TB SSD, and 144Hz display, or other models that came with 240Hz if competing topics were focused on you.

There are also a few different options that can satisfy your needs, such as the i5-10300H, the $ 1,550 GTX 1660 Ti version (approximately £ 1,150 / A $ 2,050) with a teeny 256GB SSD, or a beefed i9-10980HK 32GB of RAM for $ 3,200 (approximately £ 2,350 / AU $ 4,200).

Available versions will vary by region, but there seems to be a lot of selections around the world so you won’t have a problem finding a feature like your lifestyle or wallet. It can confuse you a little with the optional number available, so make sure you read the product details in detail to avoid disappointment.

Design

Legion 7i follows the current trend of building ‘hybrid’ laptops that reduce traditional art in favor of something that can be passed as a business device if needed. Since many working professionals may choose to use a laptop over a desktop, it makes sense to appeal to a market that does not want to spend money on two different machines.

The slate gray aluminum chassis is extremely modern, a high-quality exterior that would never look the best in a high-end ultrabook. That’s right if you don’t look too hard on the big holes that cut through the sides and back, as well as the bright RGB lights that illuminate them.

Seriously, these are some of the brightest lights we’ve seen on a portable gaming computer for some time, so if you’re at that time you can’t go wrong with this. The lights also illuminate the keyboard and illuminate with a ‘Y’ of the Legion sign on the back of the display.

Lenovo Legion 7i Full Review

The bright effects can be captivated thanks to, or at least modified in taste in the pre-installed software Legion Vantage, so if you don’t want to handle a small disco while working this looks like a great device when needed.

The 15.6-inch display has a 1080p resolution with extremely small bezels, aiding in the modern beauty of the device. There’s a small notch found at the top that contains a 720p webcam, which in fact is a decent web camera considering this is a gaming-focused laptop. We doubt that you would like to use it as your first streaming camera, but it is more than worth video calls. There is also a built-in secret cover which is nice if you are worried about that kind of thing.

The touchpad is fun to use when you need it, and thankfully it is very responsive so while we hope you won’t use it to try to play with it, any daily activities can be completed without mouse or frustration. Its position is on the left side of regular laptops anyway, and we’ve found that our palm will crack more when trying to use ‘WASD’ in games, so we’d recommend turning it off so you can use the mouse while actually playing anything.

Legion 7i follows the current trend of building ‘hybrid’ laptops that reduce traditional art in favor of something that can be passed as a business device if needed. Since many working professionals may choose to use a laptop over a desktop, it makes sense to appeal to a market that does not want to spend money on two different machines.

The slate gray aluminum chassis is extremely modern, a high-quality exterior that would never look the best in a high-end ultrabook. That’s right if you don’t look too hard on the big holes that cut through the sides and back, as well as the bright RGB lights that illuminate them.

Seriously, these are some of the brightest lights we’ve seen on a portable gaming computer for some time, so if you’re at that time you can’t go wrong with this. The lights also illuminate the keyboard and illuminate with a ‘Y’ of the Legion sign on the back of the display.

The bright effects can be captivated thanks to, or at least modified in taste in the pre-installed software Legion Vantage, so if you don’t want to handle a small disco while working this looks like a great device when needed.

The 15.6-inch display has a 1080p resolution with extremely small bezels, aiding in the modern beauty of the device. There’s a small notch found at the top that contains a 720p webcam, which in fact is a decent web camera considering this is a gaming-focused laptop. We doubt that you would like to use it as your first streaming camera, but it is more than worth video calls. There is also a built-in secret cover which is nice if you are worried about that kind of thing.

The touchpad is fun to use when you need it, and thankfully it is very responsive so while we hope you won’t use it to try to play with it, any daily activities can be completed without mouse or frustration. Its position is on the left side of regular laptops anyway, and we’ve found that our palm will crack more when trying to use ‘WASD’ in games, so we’d recommend turning it off so you can use the mouse while actually playing anything.

The aforementioned display is available in any of the 144Hz or 240Hz options, which will not make a difference to anyone who is not at a high level of competitive sports, but it should definitely be mentioned to stop anyone investing more in what they use I would not need. 144Hz is perfect for everything except games like Fortnite or Apex Legends, and jumping to 240Hz won’t be visible to many even if you’re playing multiplayer FPS.

The keyboard is decent – it won’t hit the human mind, but it’s responsive and touching. It’s a shame that the mechanical keyboard wouldn’t have been installed, but it’s clear that the Legion 7i’s hybrid style would have been ruined if you had to fill out office spreadsheets while sounding like a Gatling gun.

The bonus of buying a gaming laptop for use at work is that they rarely have the same objections to ports made by most modern ultrabooks. You get a USB-C port with the help of Thunderbolt 3 and a standard left-handed jackpot, while the right-hand side features a single USB 3.1 port.

On the back of the laptop are two other USB 3.1 ports, an HDMI connection, an Ethernet jack, and a power connection.

Grades

Here’s how the Lenovo Legion 7i performed in our benchmark test program:

3DMark: Night Raid: 44,643; Fire Strike: 17,995; Time Spy: 8,515
Cinebench R20: 3,205 points
GeekBench 5: (single-core) 1,261 (multi-core) 6,699
PCMark 10 (Home Test): 6,522
PCMark 10 Battery Life: 3 hours 11 minutes
Battery Life (TechRadar movie test): 2 hours 16 minutes
Total War: Three Kingdoms (1080p, Ultra): 71 fps; (1080p, Low): 187 fps
Metro Exodus (1080p, Ultra): 65 fps; (1080p, Low): 165 fps

Performance

The Lenovo Legion 7i may not look good for the office, but it is a complete beast of the gaming laptop – a business on the streets and AAA degrees with smooth fps on sheets if you like. It handles almost every game we throw in without a hitch, bringing the best frame values ​​to most AAA topics even if it is subject to full-click settings.

Something we noticed during the test was that it was much cooler than most other gaming laptops we had recently tested, and while the fans were kicking it didn’t sound like a small plane coming off the desk. The bottom cover was cool enough that you could place the device on your lap in case you need to, but remember that any gaming laptop will work much hotter than normal equipment.

While Max-Q’s graphics are a fluid version of the standard RTX 2080 Super mobile, the Legion 7i actually performed better than other RTX 3000 laptops in our branding results, reaching 65 fps recommended using the Advanced Metro Exodus and 71 fps in full battle: Three kingdoms.

We also used it to play a few FPS titles such as Valiant and Apex legends, and while performance certainly wouldn’t make us any better in the game, it provided an excellent environment with 200+ frames per second with even high-resolution graphics at 1080p.

If you want to play around with a variety of operating modes then the pre-installed Lenovo Vantage software we mentioned earlier also allows for quick switching between configurations, as well as some overtime capabilities.

This would be a good choice for developers who do not want to flourish in a gaming laptop and workspace of some kind, RTX 2080 Super GPU is more than enough to enable many Adobe applications and various other video editing programs, 3D rendering, and more. That doesn’t mean it’s the best option available, as the workstation devices are there for a good reason, but if you’re overwhelmed by the budget Legion 7i should see it clearly.

Battery life

If you have used gaming laptops before then you will be set to the bar instead of the floor, but for anyone unfamiliar with the power pull required by these devices – be prepared to lower expectations. The Legion 7i handled three hours and 11 minutes in a PCMark battery test, with a TechRadar looped movie test lasting 2 hours and 16 minutes.

In fact, most of the games we’ve tried barely reached the 90-minute mark, so if you’re looking for a device that you can use to play games remotely it probably isn’t. We’ve certainly seen the worst effects of battery life when reviewing game-focused laptops, but this feels just as lacking.

If you need something professional looking to play games on a short train ride then this is still the way it is, especially as devices with large batteries tend to look at the subtle look of an ‘angry player,’ but you’ll be lucky enough to completely compare multiple competing titles.

Buy it if…

You need something to work with and play
If you turn off the blinding RGB lights, the Legion 7i has an external expert to have the best of both worlds.

You have some setup requirements
Legion 7i comes with many different specifications, so you can take into account your playing preferences (or financial limitations) on your purchase.

Cool play games without compromise

While the Legion has no choice of the GeForce RTX 3000 series, the performance of the game is still unbelievable, and with some fun launch thermals – something more than 3000 laptops struggle with.

Don’t buy it if…

You will be far from the source of power
While gaming laptops are less well known for long battery life, there are better options available for remote games than the Legion 7i if you can camp near a wall socket.

Looking for the latest hardware
While there is a fair amount of setup available, you can’t get 11th gen Intel CPUs or other graphics for the GeForce RTX 3000 series.

She loves AMD
Without all the options, the Lenovo Legion 7i is Intel / Nvidia only at the time of writing, so any AMD Ryzen or Radeon fans should look elsewhere.

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